Category: solar system

Photo

Photo

Enceladus in Silhouette

Enceladus in Silhouette

Neptune’s shrinking vortex

Neptune’s shrinking vortex

Hubble delivers first insight into atmospheres…

Hubble delivers first insight into atmospheres of potentially habitable planets orbiting TRAPPIST-1

spaceplasma:   In April and July 2014, the Su…

spaceplasma:

 

In April and July 2014, the Sun emitted three jets of energetic
particles into space, that were quite exceptional: the particle flows
contained such high amounts of iron and helium-3, a rare variety of
helium, as have been observed only few times before. Since these
extraordinary events occurred on the backside of our star, they were not
discovered immediately. A group of researchers headed by the Max Planck
Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) and the Institute for
Astrophysics of the University of Göttingen (Germany) present a
comprehensive analysis now in the Astrophysical Journal.  [more]

The
refereed

paper on arXiv:  3He-rich

Solar Energetic Particles in Helical Jets on the Sun (PDF)

spaceplasma:Prominence liftoff on the eastern …

spaceplasma:

Prominence liftoff on the eastern solar limb.

celestialreconnaissance: Swirls of Jupiter …

celestialreconnaissance:

Swirls of Jupiter

Jupiter is a very stormy, turbulent, violent planet. The planet completes a day (or one complete rotation) within roughly 10 hours, which creates massive winds, producing these swirls, and violent storms. The fast rotation coupled with the fact that the planet is nothing but gas greatly multiplies the Coriolis effect. Earth too has a Coriolis effect, this creates the characteristic hurricane shapes and also contributes to the fact that storms will spin the opposite direction in different hemispheres. Luckily, our rotation is slower – our storms are less frequent and less violent than they would be if our days were shorter.

The above images come from the recent Juno mission by NASA.

astronomyblog: Saturn, rings and moons seen b…

astronomyblog:

Saturn, rings and moons seen by the Cassini spacecraft wow!

Image credit: NASA/JPL (original video)

astronomyblog: This image of Jupiter was tak…

astronomyblog:

This image of Jupiter was taken by Juno on December 16 and then processed by citizen scientist David Marriott.

Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / David Marriott 

run2damoon: Cassini 1997-2017 – Mac Rebisz

run2damoon:

Cassini 1997-2017

Mac Rebisz