Category: planet

astronomyblog: Saturn, rings and moons seen b…

astronomyblog:

Saturn, rings and moons seen by the Cassini spacecraft wow!

Image credit: NASA/JPL (original video)

Processed using infrared and ultraviolet (IR…

Processed using infrared and ultraviolet (IR2, UV1) filtered images of Venus taken by Akatsuki on May 17 2016.

credit: JAXA/ISAS/DARTS/Kevin M. Gill

astronomyblog: This image of Jupiter was tak…

astronomyblog:

This image of Jupiter was taken by Juno on December 16 and then processed by citizen scientist David Marriott.

Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / David Marriott 

Saturn, rings and moons seen by the Cassini sp…

Saturn, rings and moons seen by the Cassini spacecraft wow!

Image credit: NASA/JPL (original video)

Saturn observed by space probe Voyager 1 on No…

Saturn observed by space probe Voyager 1 on November 16, 1980

Credit: NASA

Jupiter Blues

Jupiter Blues

Saturn, Mercury and comet C/2012 S1credit: Hi…

Saturn, Mercury and comet C/2012 S1

credit:

Hisayoshi Kato

This artist’s impression shows the free-floati…

This artist’s impression shows the free-floating planet CFBDSIR J214947.2-040308.9. This is the closest such object to the Solar System. It does not orbit a star and hence does not shine by reflected light; the faint glow it emits can only be detected in infrared light. Here we see an artist’s impression of an infrared view of the object with an image of the central parts of the Milky Way from the VISTA infrared survey telescope in the background. The object appears blueish in this near-infrared view because much of the light at longer infrared wavelengths is absorbed by methane and other molecules in the planet’s atmosphere. In visible light the object is so cool that it would only shine dimly with a deep red colour when seen close-up.

Credit: ESO/L. Calçada/P. Delorme/R. Saito/VVV Consortium

The artist conception shows a newly formed s…

The artist conception shows a newly formed star surrounded by a swirling protoplanetary disk of dust and gas. Debris coalesces to create rocky ‘planetesimals’ that collide and grow to eventually form planets. The results of this study show that small planets form around stars with a wide range of heavy element content suggesting that their existence might be widespread in the galaxy.   

Credit: University of Copenhagen/Lars Buchhave

Assembled using orange, green, and blue filter…

Assembled using orange, green, and blue filtered images taken by Voyager 2 on August 24 1989.

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Kevin M. Gill