Category: jupiter

Jupiter and Io taken by the Cassini spacecraft…

Jupiter and Io taken by the Cassini spacecraft on December 1, 2000.

Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Jupiter is perpetually covered with clouds com…

Jupiter is perpetually covered with clouds composed of ammonia crystals and possibly ammonium hydrosulfide. The clouds are located in the tropopause and are arranged into bands of different latitudes, known as tropical regions. These are sub-divided into lighter-hued zones and darker belts. The interactions of these conflicting circulation patterns cause storms and turbulence. Wind speeds of 100 m/s (360 km/h) are common in zonal jets. The zones have been observed to vary in width, color and intensity from year to year, but they have remained sufficiently stable for scientists to give them identifying designations.

The cloud layer is only about 50 km (31 mi) deep, and consists of at least two decks of clouds: a thick lower deck and a thin clearer region. There may also be a thin layer of water clouds underlying the ammonia layer. Supporting the idea of water clouds are the flashes of lightning detected in the atmosphere of Jupiter. These electrical discharges can be up to a thousand times as powerful as lightning on Earth. The water clouds are assumed to generate thunderstorms in the same way as terrestrial thunderstorms, driven by the heat rising from the interior.

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Jupiter has 12 newly discovered moons!! I real…

Jupiter has 12 newly discovered moons!! I really relate to Valetudo, for some reason…

This unusual image was taken at dusk from Co…

This unusual image was taken at dusk from Coral Towers Observatory using a modified Canon 5D Mk II and 600 mm lens plus extenders. It shows Jupiter rising through a thick bank of clouds on the eastern horizon. The star-like object immediately below Jupiter is probably the combined light from Io and Europa.

Image credit: Joseph Brimacombe

Venus, Jupiter and Mars at Dawn – Oct 22, 20…

Venus, Jupiter and Mars at Dawn – Oct 22, 2015

Image credit: Joseph Brimacombe

The puzzling, fascinating surface of Jupiter…

The puzzling, fascinating surface of Jupiter’s icy moon Europa looms large in this newly-reprocessed color view, made from images taken by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft in the late 1990s. This is the color view of Europa from Galileo that shows the largest portion of the moon’s surface at the highest resolution.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute

Jupiter in infrared, Shoemaker–Levy 9 collis…

Jupiter in infrared, Shoemaker–Levy 9 collision (left), Io (right)

Comet Shoemaker–Levy 9 was a comet that broke apart in July 1992 and collided with Jupiter in July 1994, providing the first direct observation of an extraterrestrial collision of Solar System objects. This generated a large amount of coverage in the popular media, and the comet was closely observed by astronomers worldwide. The collision provided new information about Jupiter and highlighted its possible role in reducing space debris in the inner Solar System.

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NASA’s Galileo spacecraft acquired its…

NASA’s Galileo spacecraft acquired its highest resolution images of Jupiter’s moon Io on 3 July 1999 during its closest pass to Io since orbit insertion in late 1995. Most of Io’s surface has pastel colors, punctuated by black, brown, green, orange, and red units near the active volcanic centers. A true color version of the mosaic has been created to show how Io would appear to the human eye.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL

Just like on Earth, other planets in the solar…

Just like on Earth, other planets in the solar system also have auroras. Jupiter’s auroras are the strongest in the solar system. These images were captured by the Juno, Galileo and Hubble probes.

Imagens: NASA, ESA, Juno, Galileo, Hubble

This image captures swirling cloud belts and…

This image captures swirling cloud belts and tumultuous vortices within Jupiter’s northern hemisphere.

The region seen here is somewhat chaotic and turbulent, given the various swirling cloud formations. In general, the darker cloud material is deeper in Jupiter’s atmosphere, while bright cloud material is high. The bright clouds are most likely ammonia or ammonia and water, mixed with a sprinkling of unknown chemical ingredients.

Image Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt /Seán Doran