Category: hubble

Messier 101 by Robert Gendler

Messier 101 

by Robert Gendler

The Sombrero Galaxy from Hubble 

The Sombrero Galaxy from Hubble 

Credit: NASA

This image shows part of the Tarantula Nebul…

This image shows part of the Tarantula Nebula’s outskirts. This famously beautiful nebula, located within the

Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).  

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA: acknowledgement: Josh Barrington

In the nearby galaxy, the Small Magellanic C…

In the nearby galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud, a massive star has exploded as a supernova, and begun to dissipate its interior into a spectacular display of colorful filaments.

The supernova remnant (SNR), known as “E0102” for short, is the greenish-blue shell of debris just below the center of the Hubble image.

Credit: NASA/ESA Hubble

Galaxies: Messier 106,  Messier 83 and Messier…

Galaxies: Messier 106,  Messier 83 and Messier 66

credit: NASA/ESA Hubble

A clash among members of a famous galaxy qui…

A clash among members of a famous galaxy quintet reveals an assortment of stars across a wide colour range, from young, blue stars to aging, red stars.

Credit: NASA, ESA and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team

This image compares two new views of the Eagle…

This image compares two new views of the Eagle Nebula’s Pillars of Creation captured by Hubble.

On the left the pillars are seen in visible light, capturing the multi-coloured glow of gas clouds, wispy tendrils of dark cosmic dust, and the rust-coloured elephants’ trunks of the nebula’s famous pillars.

The image belowis taken in infrared light, which penetrates much of the obscuring dust and gas and unveils a more unfamiliar view of the pillars.

Credit: NASA, ESA/Hubble and the Hubble Heritage Team

This picturesque view from the NASA/ESA Hubble…

This picturesque view from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope peers into the distant universe to reveal a galaxy cluster called Abell 2537.

Galaxy clusters such as this one contain thousands of galaxies of all ages, shapes and sizes, together totaling a mass thousands of times greater than that of the Milky Way. These groupings of galaxies are colossal — they are the largest structures in the Universe to be held together by their own gravity.

Clusters are useful in probing mysterious cosmic phenomena like dark energy and dark matter, which can contort space itself. There is so much matter stuffed into a cluster like Abell 2537 that its gravity has visible effects on its surroundings. Abell 2537’s gravity warps the very structure of its environment (spacetime), causing light to travel along distorted paths through space. This phenomenon can produce a magnifying effect, allowing us to see faint objects that lie far behind the cluster and are thus otherwise unobservable from Earth. Abell 2537 is a particularly efficient lens, as demonstrated by the stretched stripes and streaking arcs visible in the frame. These smeared shapes are in fact galaxies, their light heavily distorted by the gravitational field of Abell 2537.

  • Credit: ESA/Hubble/NASA
  • Text Credit: European Space Agency 

Spectacular jets powered by the gravitationa…

Spectacular jets powered by the gravitational energy of a super massive black hole in the core of the elliptical galaxy Hercules A illustrate the combined imaging power of two of astronomy’s cutting-edge tools, the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3, and the recently upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico.

Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Baum & C. O’Dea (RIT), R. Perley & W. Cotton (NRAO/AUI/NSF), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Red Spider Nebula

Red Spider Nebula

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