Category: galaxia

NGC 1055

Image credit:

Roger Hutchinson

This picture, taken by Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys, shows NGC 4696, the largest galaxy in the Centaurus Cluster.

The huge dust lane, around 30 000 light-years across, that sweeps across the face of the galaxy makes NGC 4696 look different from most other elliptical galaxies. Viewed at certain wavelengths, strange thin filaments of ionised hydrogen are visible within it. In this picture, these structures are visible as a subtle marbling effect across the galaxy’s bright centre.

Credit: ESA/Hubble and NASA

Arp 274 is a system of three galaxies that appear to be partially overlapping in the image, although they may be at somewhat different distances. The spiral shapes of two of these galaxies appear mostly intact. The third galaxy (far left) is more compact, but shows evidence of star formation.

Two of the three galaxies are forming new stars at a high rate. This is evident in the bright blue knots of star formation that are strung along the arms of the galaxy on the right and along the small galaxy on the left.

Credit: NASA & ESA

Against a stunning backdrop of thousands of galaxies, this odd-looking galaxy with the long streamer of stars appears to be racing through space, like a runaway pinwheel firework.

This picture of the galaxy UGC 10214 was taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), which was installed aboard the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope in March (2002) during Servicing Mission 3B. Dubbed the ‘Tadpole’, this spiral galaxy is unlike the textbook images of stately galaxies. Its distorted shape was caused by a small interloper, a very blue, compact, galaxy visible in the upper left corner of the more massive Tadpole. The Tadpole resides about 420 million light-years away in the constellation Draco.

Credit: NASA, Holland Ford (JHU), the ACS Science Team and ESA

The Spindle Galaxy (NGC 5866), a lenticular galaxy in the Draco constellation. This image shows that lenticular galaxies may retain a considerable amount of dust in their disk. There is little to no gas and thus they are considered deficient in interstellar matter.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA

Andromeda Galaxy 

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech / processed by

Judy Schmidt

NGC 3147

image credit:
Judy Schmidt

Clouds of the Large Magellanic Cloud 

Image Credit: Team Ciel Austral – J. C. Canonne, N. Outters, P. Bernhard, D. Chaplain, L. Bourgon

This rich galaxy cluster, catalogued as CL0024+17, is allowing astronomers to probe the distribution of dark matter in space. The blue streaks near the center of the image are the smeared images of very distant galaxies that are not part of the cluster. The distant galaxies appear distorted because their light is being bent and magnified by the powerful gravity of CL0024+17, an effect called gravitational lensing. Dark matter cannot be seen because it does not shine or reflect light. Astronomers can only detect its influence by how its gravity affects light. By mapping the distorted light created by gravitational lensing, astronomers can trace how dark matter is distributed in the cluster. While mapping the dark matter, astronomers found a dark-matter ring near the cluster’s center. The ring’s discovery is among the strongest evidence that dark matter exists. The Hubble observations were taken in November 2004 by the Advanced Camera for Surveys.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, M.J. Jee and H. Ford (Johns Hopkins University)

This rich galaxy cluster, catalogued as CL0024+17, is allowing astronomers to probe the distribution of dark matter in space. The blue streaks near the center of the image are the smeared images of very distant galaxies that are not part of the cluster. The distant galaxies appear distorted because their light is being bent and magnified by the powerful gravity of CL0024+17, an effect called gravitational lensing. Dark matter cannot be seen because it does not shine or reflect light. Astronomers can only detect its influence by how its gravity affects light. By mapping the distorted light created by gravitational lensing, astronomers can trace how dark matter is distributed in the cluster. While mapping the dark matter, astronomers found a dark-matter ring near the cluster’s center. The ring’s discovery is among the strongest evidence that dark matter exists. The Hubble observations were taken in November 2004 by the Advanced Camera for Surveys.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, M.J. Jee and H. Ford (Johns Hopkins University)