Category: atmosphere

Saturn’s atmosphere exhibits a banded pa…

Saturn’s atmosphere exhibits a banded pattern similar to Jupiter’s, but Saturn’s bands are much fainter and are much wider near the equator. The nomenclature used to describe these bands is the same as on Jupiter. Saturn’s finer cloud patterns were not observed until the flybys of the Voyager spacecraft during the 1980s. Since then, Earth-based telescopy has improved to the point where regular observations can be made. The composition of the clouds varies with depth and increasing pressure.

The winds on Saturn are the second fastest among the Solar System’s planets, after Neptune’s. Voyager data indicate peak easterly winds of 500 m/s (1,800 km/h).

Thermography has shown that Saturn’s south pole has a warm polar vortex, the only known example of such a phenomenon in the Solar System. Whereas temperatures on Saturn are normally −185 °C, temperatures on the vortex often reach as high as −122 °C, suspected to be the warmest spot on Saturn.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute and Kevin M. Gill

Enceladus and Saturn Image credit: Gordan …

Enceladus and Saturn

Image credit: Gordan Ugarkovic

Observations of Earth, Soyuz, Aurora, moon and…

Observations of Earth, Soyuz, Aurora, moon and Space Shuttle Endeavor made from the International Space Station.

source: images.nasa.gov

This scene, captured with a 35mm camera from i…

This scene, captured with a 35mm camera from inside the Space Shuttle Endeavour, shows Jupiter rising above the airglow over Earth’s horizon. The crescent Moon is at top frame.

Credit: NASA

Citizen scientist Rick Lundh created this ab…

Citizen scientist Rick Lundh created this abstract Jovian artwork using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA’s Juno spacecraft.

Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Rick Lundh

Juno in Jupiter (the images that appear the ju…

Juno in Jupiter (the images that appear the juno probe is just an illustration) +Jupiter

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill

Aurora Over Alaska Credit: Joshua Strang, US…

Aurora Over Alaska 

Credit: Joshua Strang, USAF, Wikipedia

Titan is primarily composed of water ice and r…

Titan is primarily composed of water ice and rocky material. Much as with Venus before the Space Age, the dense opaque atmosphere prevented understanding of Titan’s surface until new information from the Cassini–Huygens mission in 2004, including the discovery of liquid hydrocarbon lakes in Titan’s polar regions. The geologically young surface is generally smooth, with few impact craters, although mountains and several possible cryovolcanoes have been found. 

The atmosphere of Titan is largely nitrogen; minor components lead to the formation of methane and ethane clouds and nitrogen-rich organic smog. The climate—including wind and rain—creates surface features similar to those of Earth, such as dunes, rivers, lakes, seas (probably of liquid methane and ethane), and deltas, and is dominated by seasonal weather patterns as on Earth. With its liquids (both surface and subsurface) and robust nitrogen atmosphere, Titan’s methane cycle is analogous to Earth’s water cycle, at the much lower temperature of about 94 K (−179.2 °C).

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Kevin Gill

Images taken by the International Space Statio…

Images taken by the International Space Station (ISS)

credit: NASA (Expedition ISS)

This false-color composite was created with …

This false-color composite was created with images taken during the Cassini spacecraft’s closest flyby of Titan on April 16, 2005.

Credit: NASA/JPL