Category: astronomia

The 10 Brightest Stars in the Night Sky (sourc…

The 10 Brightest Stars in the Night Sky (source)

  1. Sirius
  2. Canopus
  3. Rigil Kentaurus 
  4. Arcturus
  5. Vega
  6. Capella 
  7. Rigel
  8. Procyon
  9. Achernar
  10. Betelgeuse

These dense, dark pillars of dust and gas ar…

These dense, dark pillars of dust and gas are resisting erosion from intense ultraviolet light released by the Orion Nebula’s biggest stars.
And new stars are forming. 

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

A small portion of the rough-and-tumble neig…

A small portion of the rough-and-tumble neighborhood of swirling dust and gas near one of the most massive and eruptive stars in our galaxy is seen in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image. This close-up view shows only a three light-year-wide portion of the entire Carina Nebula, which has a diameter of over 200 light-years. Located 8,000 light-years from Earth, the nebula can be seen in the southern sky with the naked eye. Credit: NASA/ESA, Hubble

Nearby dust clouds in the Milky Way Credi…

Nearby dust clouds in the Milky Way

Credit: NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

The Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), loca…

The Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on the robotic arm of NASA’s InSight lander, took this picture of the Martian surface on Nov. 26, 2018, the same day the spacecraft touched down on the Red Planet. The camera’s transparent dust cover is still on in this image, to prevent particulates kicked up during landing from settling on the camera’s lens. This image was relayed from InSight to Earth via NASA’s Odyssey spacecraft, currently orbiting Mars.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Orion constellation by MASAHIRO MIYASAKA 

Orion constellation by

MASAHIRO MIYASAKA 

ig: @astronomy.blog | tumblr: astralvibration

clouds and storms on Jupiter NASA/ SwRI/ MSSS…

clouds and storms on Jupiter

NASA/ SwRI/ MSSS/ Gerald Eichstädt/ Seán Doran

The VISIR instrument on ESO’s VLT captured thi…

The VISIR instrument on ESO’s VLT captured this stunning image of a newly-discovered massive binary star system. Nicknamed Apep after an ancient Egyptian deity, it could be the first gamma-ray burst progenitor to be found in our galaxy.

Apep’s stellar winds have created the dust cloud surrounding the system, which consists of a binary star with a fainter companion. With 2 Wolf-Rayet stars orbiting each other in the binary, the serpentine swirls surrounding Apep are formed by the collision of two sets of powerful stellar winds, which create the spectacular dust plumes seen in the image.

The reddish pinwheel in this image is data from the VISIR instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), and shows the spectacular plumes of dust surrounding Apep. The blue sources at the centre of the image are a triple star system — which consists of a binary star system and a companion single star bound together by gravity. Though only two star-like objects are visible in the image, the lower source is in fact an unresolved binary Wolf-Rayet star. The triple star system was captured by the NACOadaptive optics instrument on the VLT.

Credit: ESO/Callingham et al.

Venus at Dawn – Nov 19, 2018 image credit: …

Venus at Dawn – Nov 19, 2018

image credit:

Joseph Brimacombe

This photograph of Neptune’s southern …

This photograph of Neptune’s southern hemisphere was taken by the narrow-angle camera on NASA’s Voyager 2 when the spacecraft was 4.2 million km (2.6 million miles) from the planet.

Image credit: NASA/JPL