This image captures swirling cloud belts and…

This image captures swirling cloud belts and tumultuous vortices within Jupiter’s northern hemisphere.

The region seen here is somewhat chaotic and turbulent, given the various swirling cloud formations. In general, the darker cloud material is deeper in Jupiter’s atmosphere, while bright cloud material is high. The bright clouds are most likely ammonia or ammonia and water, mixed with a sprinkling of unknown chemical ingredients.

Image Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt /Seán Doran

From Mercury Mark II to Project Gemini : On Ja…

From Mercury Mark II to Project Gemini : On Jan. 3, 1962, the newly announced Mercury Mark II project was renamed Project Gemini. This artist’s concept of a two-person Gemini spacecraft in flight shows a cutaway view. (via NASA)

The Moon in my hands 

The Moon in my hands 

If you want your own Moon you can get it here: https://jwastronomy.shop

Just played around with my new gadget and a Milky Way shot and blend them together. This is a composite!

Feel free to share!

cypulchre:OP:  mocosoft to r/gifs

cypulchre:

OP: 

mocosoft to r/gifs

Photo

Photo

Pelican Nebula by Roberto Colombari

Pelican Nebula

by

Roberto Colombari

A self-portrait by NASA’s Curiosity ro…

A self-portrait by NASA’s Curiosity rover taken on Sol 2082 (June 15, 2018). A Martian dust storm has reduced sunlight and visibility at the rover’s location in Gale Crater. A drill hole can be seen in the rock to the left of the rover at a target site called “Duluth.”

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Your posts are awesome! I love your blog and d…

Your posts are awesome! I love your blog and deep space and I’m so happy I follow you! Have a great day!

Thank you 🙂

From the Earth, Moon and Beyond : THE OSIRIS-R…

From the Earth, Moon and Beyond : THE OSIRIS-REx mission will map and return samples from asteroid Bennu, a carbon-rich hunk of rock that might contain organic materials or molecular precursors to life. OSIRIS-Rex is expected to reach Bennu in August, 2018. (via NASA)

astronomyblog: The soaring pillar is 9.5 ligh…

astronomyblog:

The soaring pillar is 9.5 light-years, or about 57 trillion miles, high, about twice the distance from our Sun to the nearest star. Stars in the Eagle Nebula are born in clouds of cold hydrogen that reside in chaotic neighborhoods, where energy from young stars sculpts fantasy-like landscapes in the gas. The tower may be a giant incubator for those newborn stars. A torrent of ultraviolet light from a band of massive, hot, young stars (off the top of the image) is eroding the pillar.

Image credit: NASA